Posts tagged #nutrition

I've gained a new and growing comfort in my body and confidence!

We met Abby when she joined FH and signed up for our Epic Human Project that we hosted for our members back in January. Watching her transformation has been such an honor, we'll let her take it from here!

When you sign up for Fuelhouse you get access to well loved facilities and a thoughtful training schedule, but most importantly you are introduced to a team of enthusiastic teachers.

Jess, the Fuelhouse nutrition guru, is one of those awesome teachers - her expertise is first rate, her methodology is down to earth and approachable. After completing the "Epic Human Project" with Jess and Molly at the helm - I decided I needed a longer term look at my nutrition. Jess has welcomed me into her nutrition practice and is helping me find an attainable pathway to more body confidence. Weekly progress check ins, recognition that a we all need a treat sometimes, and positive energy are just a few of the things Jess shares with her clients. I would urge anyone looking for accountability and encouragement to schedule some time with Jess today!

Why did you start following FUELhouse's nutrition program? To build in accountability that is with another person - not an online site or a group leader. 

  1. How has your recent successes impacted your life?

    Reminds me what it feels like to be putting the right stuff into my body - clearer mind, more energy, etc. 

  2. What what the biggest consistent change you've made to your nutrition?

    Food prep and more consistent eating times. 

  3. Finish these two statements below;

I'VE LOST 10 lbs. 

I'VE GAINED a new and growing comfort in my body and confidence. 

NUTRITION CLINIC: 3rd Wednesday of Every Month

On the 3rd Wednesday of every month we host a FREE nutrition clinic for all FH Members with Jess Mullen.


CHANGE IS HARD. YOU DON’T HAVE TO DO IT ALONE.


Here’s a little secret: if you clean up your diet, you’ll feel better. You’ll have more energy. Improved body composition. Better athletic performance.

There’s just one problem: old habits are hard to break.

That’s where we come in. We’ll help you optimize your diet and health. It’s a process and we are here to help you through each step. We know how important food is, and we’re not here to ruin that for you.

We’ll look closely at your reality–your lifestyle, your needs.

Soon, we’ll have replaced old habits with new ones sustainable for years to come.

What you can expect:
- The Benefits of long term healthy eating and exercise
- What makes up a healthy diet
- Strategies for long term success

This will be about a 1 hour clinic, if you have ever had a question about healthy eating here is your chance to get it answered.

We hope to see everyone there. Please reserve your spot in ZenPlanner.

Jess Mullen, MS, RD, Certified Running Coach, believes you can feel better, look better and perform better, even as you age.

How To Build A Healthy Plate

Here are two easy ways to plan a healthy plate.

Photo by  Lukasz Dziegel  from  Pexels

Photo by Lukasz Dziegel from Pexels

1) The Healthy Plate Model

This is a simple way to visually figure what to put on your plate to make a healthy meal. We break the plate down into 3 parts: non-starchy vegetables, protein and starches. Fat is not part of the picture but make sure you include a little bit of it. It’s so dense, the amount visually is too small to make up a portion of the plate. 

Non-starchy vegetables (broccoli, greens, carrots, green beans, onions, bell peppers, lettuce, etc) should fill half your plate. A protein (chicken breast, fish, turkey, pork loin, tofu, ground meat, etc) will fill ¼ of your plate. The final ¼ is filled with a healthy starch (beans, quinoa, whole grain, winter squash, sweet potato, etc). When considering the volume of fat – think of the volume of your thumb – include 1-2 servings depending on your size and caloric needs. Don’t forget to include any fat in the protein source in that calculation.

If fat loss is a goal, skip the ¼ portion of starch at least once per day. If batch cooking for lunches or dinners, a 3-compartment container can be helpful but isn’t an absolute. Portioning out the meals whether in a 3-compartment container or other containers is really important to set yourself up for success and make sure you don’t eat more than planned/necessary. If you don’t know how much you should be eating, follow the next section to help you learn appropriate amounts to better hone in total volume.

 

2) The Hand Model for Portioning a Healthy Plate

This is my favorite way to easily plan out what and how much to have on your plate. This can be an eye-opening experience for some people, seeing and learning that they should include more of some foods and less of others.

Look at your hand. The size and width of your palm is the amount of cooked protein you want at meals. Ball your hands into fists. You want at least 1 fistful of non-starchy vegetables at each meal. You will want at least 2 fistfuls if you skip starch. Fat is measured by your thumb’s size. 1-2 servings of fat is appropriate at most meals. If you’re smaller and not exercising most every day, stick to 1 thumb per meal. If you’re taller and exercising most days of the week, you probably want more toward 2 thumbs worth at each meal. Finally cup your hand. Look at the inside of your cupped hand – that’s the volume of starch to have. You can also have fruit (same volume) instead of starch on occasion. 

Again if fat loss is a goal, pay most attention to the volume of starch and the volume of fat. Those tend to be the easiest ones to trip up healthy fat loss goals.

Feel free to reach out if you have any questions and let us know how this goes for you!

CONTACT JESS

Posted on February 14, 2019 .

Create space for new habits + delish recipe

November is right in the heart of Fall season. The leaves have changed colors and are starting to fall. The leaves always remind how beautiful change can be. I often resist change but Fall reminds me every year that it’s an ongoing part of life and there is good that comes from it.

Seeing all the leaves on the ground also brings up the theme of letting go. This time of year it is impossible to ignore the changes in nature. The trees are letting go of the old leaves in order for new growth to occur. How can this apply in our lives? Now is a great time to look inward and find those leaves that may have served you well in the past but are ready to be dropped now. Doing this allows us to have new growth. It creates the space needed for new ideas, relationships, habits to thrive. 

This month think about your food habits...what might be good to let go of? See how it could create time and space for you to add something new - something that feels more energizing or nourishing. Maybe less time on the computer on the weekend to allow for food prep? Let go of the afternoon caffeine and sugar fix for a more healthy snack? Commit to having a nourishing protein-rich breakfast everyday versus skipping breakfast? You don’t need to do a complete overhaul and try to change everything but I bet there’s at least one habit you can let fall away like the leaves to create space for a new habit that will serve you better now. 

Feel free to contact me for further help and support. Check out our nutrition program options here: http://www.fuelhousegym.com/nutrition-coaching/ 

Recipe of the month - Roasted Kabocha Soup - check out this easy to make, warm and cozy soup! It's a perfect pairing for most proteins and then just add a simple side salad for a balanced meal.

Roasted Kabocha Squash Soup

Recipe by Danielle Premo

Kabocha is one of my favorite squashes. Sweeter than butternut with a texture and flavor similar to pumpkin that makes a delicious creamy soup. Tasty to garnish with crispy bacon!

Serves 4 to 6 Prep time: 15 minutes Cook time: 1 hour

4 lbs Kabocha squash, halved and seeded 1T coconut oil (or other oil) 1 sweet yellow onion, diced 1⁄2 t salt 2 garlic cloves, minced 1” ginger, grated 1⁄2 t cumin 1⁄2 t coriander 2 t fresh oregano 4 c vegetable stock 1 can lite coconut milk 2 t tamari (or soy sauce) 1 t mirin 2 t fresh lime juice 1⁄2 t pepper

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the squash, skin side up on the baking sheet and cook until tender and easily pierced with a fork, about 45 minutes to 1 hour. Set aside to cool.

While the squash roasts, place a stock pot on medium heat; add oil, onions and salt. Sautee for 5 minutes then add garlic, ginger, cumin, and coriander (add a splash of stock to prevent sticking). Mix in well and let cook additional 3 minutes. Next add oregano and vegetable stock. Bring to a boil then cover with a lid and let simmer on low heat until the squash is cool.

Once squash is cool enough to handle, use a spoon to scrape the flesh from the skin into the stock pot. Bring the soup back to a simmer then add the coconut milk, tamari, mirin, lime juice and pepper. Use an immersion blender to make creamy, then serve!

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Molly's Meal Prep for the Week of Oct 8th

I’m getting my meal prep game on…finally.

Crock Pot Chicken, Sautéed yams and cauliflower with Spiraled Zucchini

Crock Pot Chicken, Sautéed yams and cauliflower with Spiraled Zucchini

My plan is to prepare all of my breakfasts, snacks and lunches in advance and save our Northwest Fit Meals for our dinners because we CAN’T and we WON’T quit them!

This weeks prep went fast because I bought the zucchini pre-spiraled and the cauliflower and yams diced at PCC which saved a ton of time. Rip the bag open and dump. My kind of prep.

I prepared the crock pot chicken first (doubled the recipe for leftovers), started the HB eggs, prepared the Amish Oatmeal (doubled) and sautéed the veggies very last! I left the zucchini raw and plan to heat when I consume for my lunch this week. I probably will top most lunches with hot sauce. In regards to the Amish Oatmeal I poured 1/8 cup of Unsweetened Almond milk on top with about 2 TBS of blueberries. If I find that I want more protein I might add a little SFH or Mountain Ops vanilla protein powder to the oatmeal or top with Ellenos Greek Yogurt

Sauteed Diced Yams and Cauliflower

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  • 1 tsp. garlic powder

  • 1 tsp.  onion powder

  • 1 tsp. oregano

  • 1 tsp. black pepper

  • Optional: 1 tbs. balsamic vinegar or hot sauce to dribble on top

  • extra virgin olive/coconut oil spray bottle

INSTRUCTIONS

In a gallon ziplock bag, combine brussels sprouts, garlic powder, onion powder, oregano and pepper. SHAKE to mix all ingredients evenly.

Preheat a skillet on medium heat for 30-60 seconds then spray the olive oil and toss in the veggie mix.  Optional: drizzle Balsamic vinegar or hot sauce when serving

All-Purpose Slow Cooker Shredded Chicken

A versatile, all-purpose shredded chicken that is made in the slow cooker. Perfect for making ahead and freezing until ready to use. Great for soups, stews, quesadillas and quick sandwiches.

Ingredients

  • 4 organic, boneless skinless chicken breasts

  • 1/2 cup chicken stock

  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder

  • 1 teaspoon onion powder

  • 1 teaspoon seasoned salt

  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

  • 1/2 dried oregano teaspoon

  • Optional: Add a twist of flavor by adding 1-2 bottles of coconut aminos and 3 TBS ginger to the pot

Instructions

Place chicken in slow cooker. Sprinkle chicken breasts with all the spices. Add chicken stock. Cover and cook on low for 4-6 hours. Shred chicken with two forks. Cool completely and if you want to freeze, divide into ziplock baggies. This makes just about six cups total and I like to the shredded chicken into three portions with two cups each.

Original recipe by @mountainmamacooks #mountainmamacooks

Pre-Spiralized Zuchinni from PCC Market

  • Check out these awesome Spiralized recipes HERE

Amish Oatmeal

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10 servings

Serving size: ¾ Cup

INGREDIENTS

  • 1  cup old fashioned oats

  • 1  cup quick quaker oats

  • 2-3  tbsp light nectar agave

  • 2/3  cup unsweetened almond milk

  • 3  tbsp grass-fed butter

  • 1  cup egg whites

  • 1 egg

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • 2 tsp vanilla extract

  • Optional: Add cinnamon or pumpkin spice

INSTRUCTIONS

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees and grease 13x9 pan with coconut oil

  • Combine all ingredients (oats, agave, melted butter, egg whites, salt, and vanilla extract) in a large mixing bowl

  • Stir well then pour into greased pan

  • Bake for 25-30 minutes or until edges are golden brown

  • Let cool then break up into little crumbles

  • Optional: top with warm almond milk, 2 tsp almond slivers and berries (not included in nutrition facts)

  • Original recipe by @healthystepsnutrition #healthystepsnutrition

SNACKS FOR THE WEEK:

APPLE + 1-2 TBS Almond butter + 1 HB EGG

CARROTS + HUMMUS







7 Tips for Eating Healthy on the Road

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Making better food choices will have a positive impact on your leisure time. As athletes know, healthy food and plenty of water sustain your energy levels, fuel your muscles, and help you recover quickly. The food you eat in the air or on the road will serve as your traveling repair kit.

Here are some tips to help you eat healthfully while you’re traveling or on a trip with buddies:

1. Healthy eating starts where you stop

If you’re on the road and stop at a fast-food joint, your food choices will be limited to fast food. But if you stop at a grocery store that offers whole or healthy foods—fruits, bagged carrots, nuts, hummus—or a supermarket that features a salad bar, you quickly expand your choices (and reduce junk-food temptations).

2. Eat frequently, and in smaller amounts

Eating small amounts of healthy food throughout the day sends a signal to your brain that the food supply is plentiful, so it’s OK to burn through those calories quickly.

Limiting your calorie load at a single sitting also gives you lots of energy. Eating too many calories in one meal—even if they’re healthy calories—sends your brain the message that leaner times must be around the corner, so those calories will get stored as fat. Eating too much at one sitting can also make you sluggish and sleepy.

3. Eat plenty of protein

Eating the right amount of complete protein—one containing all the essential amino acids your body needs—for your weight and activity level stabilizes blood sugar (preventing energy lags), enhances concentration, and keeps you lean and strong.

When you need energy for a long hike, a long drive, or a day at the beach, stoke your body with high-quality, lean protein.

4. Pack snacks so you’re not skipping meals

Often when we’re traveling, we don’t have access to food at regular intervals. Or worse, we skip meals so we can have that big piece of chocolate cake later. The problem is your body responds as if it’s facing a food shortage and your metabolism slows way down to prevent you from starving.

To keep your mind and body humming, pack healthy snacks in your car or backpack. Examples are almonds, raw vegetables and hummus, yogurt and berries, fresh and dried fruit, and hard-boiled eggs.

5. Avoid “feel bad” foods

You know what these are: They’re foods you crave, but leave you feeling sick or depleted after you eat them. When you’re on the road, it’s particularly essential to avoid foods that drain your energy and deflate your mood.

Foods to avoid: (1) simple carbohydrates or high glycemic foods, such as fruit juices, sodas, refined grain products, or sugary snacks; (2) anything deep-fried; (3) nonfat desserts and sweeteners, which are loaded with chemicals that your body can’t easily metabolize; (4) anything partially hydrogenated (this includes nondairy creamer, Jiffy-style peanut butter, margarine, and most packaged baked goods); and (5) excess alcohol.

6. Drink lots of water

Yes, water is a food. The body needs water for virtually all of its functions. Drinking plenty of water will flush your body of toxins, keep your skin fresh, and help you eat less. It will also help you avoid travel lag, symptoms of overexposure to the heat or sun, and junk-food cravings.

Believe it or not, many of the unhealthy cravings we experience on the road can be satisfied with a refreshing drink of pure water.

7. What our FUELhouse RD, Jess Mullen, packs when traveling:

First of all you need an awesome travel cooler like this…

In your Travel Cooler, have separate Tupperware containers/ziploc baggies with:

  • Cut up red pepper/celery and hummus

  • 1-2 Hard Boiled eggs

  • Sliced Grilled chicken

  • Chopped Salad with jicama, avocado and hot sauce (add the sliced chicken)

  • Probar Live Probiotic Nutrition Bar

  • We also love filling our water bottles with H2ORS to help with hydration


Training for Fat Loss

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'I can't believe how high my heart-rate got when I increased my weights. This is just as hard if not harder than any traditional "cardio" workout.' -FH Member

I can't tell you how many times I hear this once a client realizes that they've been sandbagging their main strength workouts, afraid that their going to get too bulky.

This is once of the biggest misconceptions that I have seen over and over in relation to training for fat loss. We hear it all the time, mostly women, and some men, believing that they should avoid heavy or all weight training and only perform “cardio” and abdominal exercises to get their ideal physique. 

The worst is witnessing this in group classes.  As a coach you encourage people to challenge themselves, to push to a new level because you know that the end result is what their ideally looking for.  Who wants to keep doing the same thing or lifting the same weight?  Well, I guess not everyone cares about tracking progress, but you hope, as a coach, that your people will care.  So many of our humans "get it" but so many still go through the motions during the strength portion of one of our general fitness classes and then only focus on the conditioning portion of the workout – and often followed up by a few sets of sit-ups or something similar. My guess is that if you are guilty of this approach, you probably haven’t seen very good results with it. Maybe you lost a few pounds initially, but now you have plateaued and you may have even gained a pound or two.

This faulty approach is perpetuated by the insta-google "you tube" trainer who's more interested in selfies than actually showcasing their own clients, workout routines published in “fitness” magazines, and a few common exercise myths.

LIFT HEAVY THINGS. EAT HEALTHY. GET RESULTS.

The hour or so you spend in the gym accounts for a very small portion of your daily caloric expenditure. Unless you are a professional athlete that trains and practices for several hours each day (did you hear that? I'll repeat....trains several hours a day), the large majority of your daily caloric expenditure comes from your Basal Metabolic Rate (or BMR), the calories burned to sustain your bodily functions on a daily basis.  One of the most effective ways of increasing your BMR is through increasing the amount of lean muscle mass on your body. This is, of course, only achievable through weight training aka LIFTING AND PUTTING DOWN HEAVY SHIT, preferably in the form of deadlifts, squats, presses, and other multi-joint, compound movements. OMG no way?  Yes, yes we actually know what we're doing.  You see, for every pound of lean muscle that you add, you will burn approximately 50 calories more per day. That might not sound like much but keep in mind if you swap out 5 pounds of fat for 5 pounds of muscle, you will burn close to 300 extra calories a day before you even hit the gym. Furthermore, intense weight training results in an afterburn effect where your metabolism is elevated for up to 38 hours after your training session. This is known as excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, or EPOC.  

Doing cardio alone will only decrease your BMR as time goes on. This turns into an uphill battle as your BMR keeps dropping, you’ll need to increase the amount of cardio you do to create the same deficit. Without weight training, you’ll lose muscle which will actually account for some weight loss, and you might even lose a few pounds of fat if your diet is decent, but it’s unlikely you will achieve (or maintain) the level of fat loss you desire.

“Won’t weights make me bulky?”
Weight training will add a few pounds of needed lean body mass which will in turn make you leaner and give you a better looking physique. If you are worried about getting bulky...then we should seriously take a look at your nutrition. Most people who are afraid weights will make them bulky are the same people known to complain about being unable to lose the last the few pounds of fat around their midsection while pouring their third glass of red wine, "brunching" every weekend or think gluten free pasta will solve all their problems.  These same people are the ones to point the finger at their current fitness program being the culprit of their plateau or weight gain, not the other 10-12 hours outside the gym. Yes. It must be our fault. Not theirs. 

TAKE RESPONSIBILITY. OWN YOUR SHIT.

BE ACCOUNTABLE.

“So how do I go about increasing my lean body mass and improving my body composition?”
Definitely focus on the strength component in our group workouts and push yourself during the finishers. Find an accountability buddy through the Tribe to do this with you!  If you want to get more experienced with lifting, consider signing up for the Tactical Strength Challenge on Oct 28th or any of our Barbell STRONG classes. You’ll focus on the core lifts, increasing strength, lean body mass, and overall performance. Many of our members signed up for the TSC or who have established a Performance/Strength goal with one of our coaches, have leaned out while getting stronger at the same time. Also, look into signing up for a nutritional consult with Coach Meg, or even the upcoming nutrition challenge that kicks off Sept 11th or our 6-Week Get FUELed specialty group for non-members and FH members!  You’ll get some useful instruction on how to dial in your nutrition so that you can improve your body composition and performance with a sustainable approach.  Need some dedicated 1:1 time to get dialed in and serious?  Then consider 1:1 training with any of our FH Coaches!

Take a look at your current approach to training and be honest about how well it has worked for you. Ask yourself: "How do I want to feel in 6-Weeks?".  If you are less than 100% satisfied with your current results, we hope you’ll consider our recommendations. And as always, feel free to consult any of your FUELHOUSE coaches if you need further guidance.